Mosin Nagant M91-30
Трёхлинейка (three lines - because 7.62 mm is approximately three line units)
Mosinka
Gewehr 254(r)
Mosin.jpg
General Historical Information
Place of origin Russian Empire
Manufacturer Izhevsk Mechanical Plant
Tula Arms Plant
Produced In 1891
Type Bolt-action rifle
Effective range 300 m (iron sights)
Magazine 5 rounds
Ammunition 7.62×54mmR
General Ingame Information
Used by USSR
Finland (captured)
Germany (Captured)
Bayonets M1891 Mosin-Nagant Bayonet
Rifle grenades VPGS-41
Mosin Nagant photo.jpg


Bramit.1.jpg

The Mosin Nagant M91-30 is a bolt-action rifle in FHSW.

In game[edit | edit source]

In game, the rifle's accuracy is slightly more accurate, and reload time is shorter, compared to other rifles.

Engineer kits and kits with the Panzerfaust are mainly equipped with the carbine variant. It is suitable for close range, as accuracy at medium range is somewhat poor. Cavalrymen also have the carbine, but if they pull out the bayonet mounted it will be the rifle length version.

History[edit | edit source]

Mosin-Nagant began its long life with a competition to replace the aging single shot Berdan rifles that equipped the Tsarist army. The winning design was Russian Captain Sergei Ivanovich Mosin's rifle, with the addition of the clip feed, magazine spring and feed interrupter of Belgian Léon Nagant's proposal. The original Mosin rifle was made in Infantry, Dragoon and Cossack variants.

Following the victory of the Red Army in the Civil War, the decision was taken to modernise the rifle. The M91/30 was based on the earlier Dragoon rifle, many of which were reworked to the new standard. Improvements included a hooded post front sight, flat rear sight marked in metres, and eventually a change from the octagonal "hex" receivers to round ones. By 1945, 17.4 million M91/30 rifles had been manufactured.

Several different designs of rifle grenades were made prior to and during the second world war. The Dyakonov rifle grenade launcher was issued starting in 1928 and ended in 1942. The main rounds for the launcher were flare and fragmentation rounds. In contrast to other rifle grenades that were shot using blank rifle rounds, the Dyakonov could be fired using live rifle rounds. The VPGS-41 was a standalone rifle grenade with shaped charge projectile that did not require a separate launcher, it was designed to destroy vehicles.

Mosin Rifles and deriatives of it were the staple of finnish army even after the second world war. With the creation of the finnish army as Finland became an independent state following the first world war and collapse of Tsarist Russia, Russian army equipment that were in previously russian controlled finland was then issued in the finnish army. Many more Mosin Nagant rifles were captured during the winter war and continuation war. The wide usage of captured or domestic production of weapons based on soviet weaponry meant that ammunition could be captured and reissued without issues.

A suppressor entered official production starting in 1940, designed by the brothers Mitin who earlier had designed a suppressor for the Nagant M1895 revolver. The BraMit suppressor was attached on the rifle in the same way as the M1891 Mosin-Nagant Bayonet. If also loaded with subsonic ammunition the rifle could fire quite quietly, albeit with reduced effective range. This attachment is not available in FHSW.

Mosin Nagant M91-30 sniper[edit | edit source]

Mosin Nagant M91-30 Sniper
Mosin sniper.jpg
General Historical Information
Place of origin Soviet Union
Manufacturer Izhevsk Mechanical Plant
Tula Arms Plant
Type Bolt-action rifle
Effective range 600 m (telescopic sight)
Magazine 5 rounds
Ammunition 7.62×54mmR
General Ingame Information
Used by USSR
Finland (captured)
Germany (Captured)
Scope PE scope
Sniper Mosin photo.jpg


The M91/30 also had some success as a sniper rifle, fitted with either a PE, PEM, or most commonly a PU scope. The mounting of these scopes above the receiver meant that a bent bolt had to be fitted. The PU was preferred and used on most of the sniper versions. There was no bayonet issued and the foresight was raised 1mm, which allowed the open sights to be used out to 600 meters.

The 1891/30 sniper proved to be an exceptional sniper rifle, perhaps even the best of WWII. The rifles were mass-produced, with as many as 330,000 of the sniper variants being produced between 1941 and 1943. Of course, due to these types of production numbers, some problems arose. There were numerous complaints about the triggers, they were not adjustable, and so what came with the rifle was what you were stuck with, so hopefully it was adjusted nicely from the factory.

Another complaint was with the stock, as some of the wood used during some of the high production times was not high quality and warped a lot during changes in weather. The rifles were also long and heavy which made them a bit awkward in the field. But, despite all that, these rifles were very accurate.  It is believed that many German snipers in WWII would use captured 1891/30's as their personal sniper rifles, over their Mauser 98Ks.

The rifle stayed in service until 1963 when it was replaced in the USSR military by the SVD. The 1891/30 snipers stayed in service until the 70's with many communist countries. It actually served with the NVA during the Vietnam Conflict as well.

The Finnish designation for rifles with PU scope mounted was M/42, those with PE or PEM M/30.

Mosin Nagant M91-30 carbine[edit | edit source]

Mosin Nagant M91-30 Carbine
Mosin Nagant M38 Carbine
Kar454(r)
Mosin Carbine.jpg
General Historical Information
Place of origin Soviet Union
Germany (Captured)
Manufacturer Izhevsk Mechanical Plant
Tula Arms Plant
Produced In 1938
Type Bolt-action rifle
Effective range 300 m (ironsights)
Magazine 5 rounds
Ammunition 7.62×54mmR
General Ingame Information
Used by USSR
Used in vehicles War Horse
Mosin M38 photo.jpg

In 1938, a carbine version of the Mosin Nagant, the M38, was issued. The carbine used the same cartridge and action as other Mosins, but the barrel was shortened by eight inches to bring the weapon down to an overall length of 40 inches, with the forearm shortened in proportion.

The idea was to issue the M38 to troops such as combat engineers, signal corps, and artillerymen, who could conceivably need to defend themselves from sudden enemy advances, but whose primary duties lay behind the front lines. Significantly, the front sight of the M38 was positioned in such a way that the Model 91/30's cruciform bayonet could not be mounted to the muzzle, even if a soldier obtained one.

A 1944 model Mosin M44 Carbine variant was also made, a distinct feature of it was the folding spike bayonet which meant it could have a bayonet and if need be also as compact as the previous carbine models.

Gallery[edit | edit source]









Template:Carbines

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